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Author Topic: Please help me identify this coo-coo clock  (Read 848 times)
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Keith
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« on: July 04, 2009, 10:44:22 AM »

This coo-coo clock use to hang in my Grandmothers home.For many years i remember it would keep time,and would coo-coo right on time.It was not working when i received it.I have searched many times and can't find what i am looking for.I would like someone to tell me about how old it is,also would it be worth repairing?Some of the chains are still with it,but all the weights are missing.

There is a sticker on the back that i guess is written in German,but maybe someone here can read it.

It reads;
             706-34 An der schonen blauen Donau Brahms' Wiegenlled
              Made in Germany

Thanks for any help,and God bless,Keith
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talesofthesevenseas
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« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2009, 11:56:38 AM »

An der Schonen Blauen Donau translates as "On the Beautiful Blue Danube". It is the full name of the waltz we in the USA usually call the "Blue Danube Waltz" by Johannes Brahms. Did your cuckoo clock play this music when it struck the hour?
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regularjoe2
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2009, 12:55:49 PM »

Looks like a fairly modern West German clockworks to me .
Sometimes these would be put in a Swiss-made cabinet .

Sort of a souvenir item , but could cost a tourist up to $95.00 (U.S.D.) to walk out of a shop with it ( closer to airports & tourist areas = more cost ) .

Perhaps it might be wiser to keep an eye out for a used one (for spare parts) with the same clockworks as yours .
These clocks do tend to have need to be mainained on a regular basis , esp. the weight mechanism connected to the actual time-keeping clockworks ( they're not heavy-duty & often fail ) .

Once they've failed a few times , better to cut losses & just use as a decoration (just my opinion) .
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talesofthesevenseas
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2009, 01:05:49 PM »

I inheirited a clock from my mother-in-law, a wall-mounted clock with grandfather clockwork inside. The shop I took it to for maintenance and repair said that a well-made clock should last many generations, but that they need to be maintained and cleaned, about once every thirty years, because the teeth wear down on the gears over time. A thirty-year maintenance with cleaning and gear replacement on mine ran about $100. So I guess it would depend upon how much sentimental value the clock has for you. It can't hurt to take it in to a clock shop for an estimate.
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Keith
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2009, 02:55:25 PM »

Thanks T. I believe it may have played music,but i really can't remember.And yes,it does have a lot of sentimental value.

Thanks,regulerjoe2.When you say fairly modern,about what year are you thinking?

Thanks again,and God bless,Keith
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KC
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2009, 05:17:29 PM »

I tend to lean towards the Swiss cabinet and German insides like regularjoe2 suggested.

T got it right on with the cost to try and update these/repair/maintenance.

I would guess a time line area of 1940 - 1950's.
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regularjoe2
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« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2009, 11:02:00 PM »

My guess is late 70's through early 90's , esp. with the music box .

Many of the little die-cast music boxes from this era were imported from asian countries .
You might want to see if you can remove it from the case & inspect it , if you're of a mind to .
The music boxes from germany were worth a little bit more .

If you do decide to take it to a clockmaker , you might want to do the following tests , if you feel comfortable doing so ...( the clock-maker is really a mechanic & does not mind you telling him what works & what does not ... it might help the clock-guy give an estimate too ) .

You can do a preliminary test on the 3 gravity-powered works by threading the chains over the chain-cogs & applying some pressure by pulling on the chain .
There should be one chain for the clock ( you need the pendulum to test this one ) , one for the cuckoos , and one for the music box .
Gently move the hands of the clock to see if 'things' work , while applying pressure (pulling on) to the chain .
The music box should play at the 'hour' , birds chirp @ the 1/4 hrs & main 'chime' ( I didn't see this chime in your pics , but it should be on the access door ) will strike on at least the hour ... sometimes there's alot of noise at 12'o clock !

Most clocks of the size of yours used weights of around 320 grams ( so you'll know about how hard to pull ) .
« Last Edit: July 05, 2009, 12:31:44 AM by regularjoe2 » Logged
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