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Author Topic: Can someone help me identify this rocking horse?  (Read 3014 times)
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txpollock
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« on: March 24, 2010, 02:31:02 PM »

We have ahd this horse for 24 years.  My husband rescued it from the trash after the owners had a house fire.  The hair was singed and the horse was covered in soot.  Due to the fire damage the original leather was dry-rotted and most of it is gone now.  The horse is hollow on an iron rocker.  I am assuming it is make of some type of plastic.  I originally thought fiberglass but it has a small hole in the undersde of one leg and so I don't think it is fiberglass after all.  I haven't done anything to it except to have cleaned it up 24 years ago.  Other than that, it is in the original state in which we found it(less the leather that has since rotted and broken off)  The saddle is made of a hard plastic and I have included pictures of 2 of the only identifying marks on the horse that are on either side of the saddle.  We have done extensive research to find this horses origin.  We even had it in an antique mall about 17 years ago for a short time and got a possible origin but have been unable to confirm.  A lady told us that she saw this same horse in the department store window christmas display when she was a child.(she was about 50 at the time)  The manager of the store said it was not for sale.  The lady could not remember the name of the department store but I believe she said it was in one of the New England states.  If anyone here could help me I would be so appreciative.  I am not interested in selling this but it is such a wonderful horse....all of my children rode it when they were small and I would really like to know it's origin and possible value.

Thanks









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talesofthesevenseas
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2010, 07:03:24 PM »

There is a lot of info online for identifying older wooden rocking horses, but I'm afraid I didn't have any luck finding information on identifying vintage fiberglass/plastic ones. Without a maker's name, it will be difficult. Have you checked everywhere under the belly, bottoms of the hooves etc? I'm surprised with the logo that it has that no manufacturer's name is on it.

It does look like a very high-quality horse for the time that it was made. If I'm not mistaken, it looks like natural horsehair was used for the mane and tail, which is something usually only found in carousel horses or very high-end ones.

He's a terrific little guy and quite a survivor for having come through a fire! I'm glad that you rescued him!
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wendy177
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2010, 07:52:07 PM »

I to have search and with no results. Angry He is wonderful and he has horse or cow hair I'm leaning more towards horse. I am surprised if he is made of plastic and it was hot enough in the fire to singed his hair  he did not sustain more damage. I would try your  local library or book store to search rocking horses. will keep an eye out.
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talesofthesevenseas
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2010, 08:04:49 PM »

I don't think he is hide covered, right? The body is fiberglass or some artificial material? I think only the mane and tail are horsehair.
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txpollock
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2010, 09:16:44 PM »

Right talesof...the body is smooth and hard.  We have researched every place we could think of and haven't been able to come up with anything.  Now that you mention it wendy....I will have to go and check those eyelashes....don't know why it didn't occur to me that the horse would have "wilted" a bit in the fire if the eyelashes were singed.  It could be that someone cut them...not sure but I will look.  The horse was covered in soot but that was probably more smoke than fire.  We have loved him for all these years and just really would like to find out where this guy came from. 
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waywardangler
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2010, 10:58:27 PM »

You should be able to tell what the horse is made of by looking in that hole.  Fiberglass will have rough fibers on the inside and around the hole.  Plastic will be smooth inside and the hole will not have fibers.  Aluminum will be sharp metal and should make a metal sound (plastic and fiberglass will be dull) when tapped with a metallic object like a spoon.  Fiberglass (and maybe plastic) will also exhibit spider cracks due to age and stress especially at the leg areas where it is fastened to the rockers.  Plastic can be melted with a hot pin.  Fiberglass not so much.  Aluminum not at all.
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txpollock
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« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2010, 11:52:43 PM »

Wayward...this horse would be fiberglass according to what you said.  Fibers at the small hole...rough inside and a dull sound when knocked on.  There are no stress or spider cracks anywhere that I can see.  The feet are fastened to the rockers by bolts through the bottom of the hooves. Fiberglass may explain why it didn't melt but I still would guess that it only had smoke damage.  I can't really tell if the eyelashes were cut or singed because it has been so long now that they are just uneven.
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fancypants
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« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2010, 02:36:28 AM »

I'm curious , since seeing the rivets on your horsie assembly , if it's possible that the rocking frame of this unit is not it's original ?

What I'm getting @ is : could this be a 'fusion' of an original fiberglass coin-operated 'horsie' and a rocking stand (perhaps for window-dressing for Christmas season , etc. ) ?
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waywardangler
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« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2010, 03:02:12 AM »

Very interesting observation fancypants.  I went back and looked at the first photo and that rocker does appear to be fabricated so I do believe you are correct.  The front ends and rear are very square and would be too sharp to have been done at a factory originally making these for kids.  The lawsuits would have put them out of business in no time.  And I do not see a support for the right front leg which is odd.  The left rear leg support is fuzzy so it is hard to tell how that is fastened.  I am guessing the rocker is angle iron or possibly square tubing.  A factory rocker would be round steel tubing.  This is probably why no one can find a similar factory rocking horse to compare.  A search of merry-go-round horses or amusement ride horses may yield a similar horse for comparison.
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wendy177
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2010, 08:32:11 AM »

Awesome Fancy & wayward searched coin operated and it looks like that could be the answer!!!! Tx found this company they charge $50.00 for full history & details on horses. personally I think it would be worth the money to get some answers on your little fella. http://www.carouselworkshop.com please let us know what you find.
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waywardangler
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« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2010, 10:22:45 AM »

After looking at the site Wendy provided, it occurred to me that if this indeed was a coin operated or kiddie horse in its' previous life, there should be some old mounting holes on the belly or opposite side where it was attached to the ride base.  txpollock are there any old holes anywhere on this horse other than the one hole you mentioned on the underside of one leg?

After looking at more images, I think this style pony was more like a pony from a pony cart ride.  The belly fit in a cradle while the legs were attached to a mechanism that would go up and down when the wheel they rode on would go over a bump.  This would explain the hole(s) in the legs but nowhere else on the body.  See pic for visual on mechanism.  It is also possible this whole pony/rocker was on a similar type kiddie ride that rocked back and forth when going around or on some type of track.  This would also explain the presence of a saddle and reins.  I would guess this was for very young children 4-6 or so and accompanied by a close standing adult.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2010, 11:21:50 AM by waywardangler » Logged
txpollock
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« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2010, 06:35:22 PM »

Wendy...Yes I would be glad to pay someone $50.00 if I could get the info I've been searching for.  Thanks for the link.  Wayward...no mounting holes and the one hole that is there looks to be from a possilbe mishap.  The hole does not seem to be ther intentionally.  
Here is a picture of the hole so you can see that it was probably an accident.

This hole is actually on the backside of the right rear leg.  Checking further, we are finding no other holes.  The 3 hooves are firmly fastened with bolts and the horse is very sturdy so my guess is that the balance was good with 3 legs and the right front hoof was not needed for stability.  
« Last Edit: March 25, 2010, 06:44:15 PM by txpollock » Logged
wendy177
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« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2010, 06:56:40 PM »

If only this little guy could talk!!!! Grin
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sapphire
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« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2010, 09:16:55 PM »

tx, you might want to check out this site to see if there might be one similar here.  Wouldn't hurt to get in contact with them too, they might be able to tell you just what you do have.

http://www.carouselworkshop.com/cat25.htm
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sapphire
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« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2010, 09:53:14 PM »

Also found these, both German made from around 1920.  Doesn't specify what they are made of but the form is similar.  They both appear to have a metal pole reaching up to their underside (the first one seems closer to the breast area). Wonder if it is possible that it is not attached, but more a bracing for support?

Going to check the company name to see if anything comes up with that  Wink

http://www.rockinghorsedesign.com/antics.htm


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